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Economics of farmed fish-products. Which factors determine the feasibility of fish farming projects?
Davidse, W.P. (1989). Economics of farmed fish-products. Which factors determine the feasibility of fish farming projects?, in: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. pp. 1153-1158
In: De Pauw, N. et al. (Ed.) (1989). Aquaculture: a biotechnology in progress: volume 1. European Aquaculture Society: Bredene, Belgium. ISBN 90-71625-03-6. 1-592 pp., more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

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  • Davidse, W.P.

Abstract
    The economics of fish farming are described from the marketing point of view. Consumption patterns for fish products are traditionally formed, on the basis of national and regional fish landings. As a consequence of this farmed species which are well known or do not differ much from well known species have most favorable market outlooks. New species in the fish market need an intensive marketing effort and a successtul result will be highly uncertain. The Dutch story of the farmed African catfish is an illustration of this market feature. Eel farming on a commercial scale has started in the Netherlands in 1985. Smoked eel has a long tradition in the Netherlands as a fish delicacy, so that the market environment is very favorable for this farmed fish. With a yearly imported quantity of 4 200t eel the Netherlands are at the top of the European eel importers, followed by the Fed. Rep Germany (4 100t of import). Market opportunities have a major influence on the income of the fish farmer. A second important factor which determines the success of a fish farming project is the capability of the fish farmer. This capability is reflected by the fish production per m³. Differences in the cost price per kg produced fish are mainly caused by differences in production volume at a given production capacity of the farming system. An example of catfish farming in the Netherlands learned that a 20% lower production level causes a rise in the cost price from US$3.35 to US$3.75 kg-1. A 20% lower food conversion ratio has a less unfavorable effect on this cost price. Cost prices of farmed eel will even be more influenced by differences in produced quantities because of higher investments per kg of production capacity. So the capabilities of the eel farmer even have a greater impact on the cost price than in catfish farming.

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