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Irrigation scheme or mosquito hazard: a case study in Mwea Irrigation Scheme
Mwangi, R.W.; Mukiama, T.K. (1992). Irrigation scheme or mosquito hazard: a case study in Mwea Irrigation Scheme, in: Mavuti, K.M. et al. (Ed.) (1993). Recent Advances in Hydrobiology and Fisheries in Eastern Africa: Proceedings of the 1st Symposium of Hydrobiological Society of East Africa, on State of Knowledge and Recent Research Advances in Freshwater and Marine Biology in Eastern Africa, held in Nairobi, Kenya, 13-16 December 1988. pp. 19-22
In: Mavuti, K.M.; Jaccarini, V.; Martens, E.E. (Ed.) (1993). Recent Advances in Hydrobiology and Fisheries in Eastern Africa: Proceedings of the 1st Symposium of Hydrobiological Society of East Africa, on State of Knowledge and Recent Research Advances in Freshwater and Marine Biology in Eastern Africa, held in Nairobi, Kenya, 13-16 December 1988. Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht. IX, 110 pp., more
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: The Hague. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Fresh water

Authors  Top 
  • Mwangi, R.W.
  • Mukiama, T.K.

Abstract
    A survey of the mosquito fauna in the Mwea-Tebere Irrigation Scheme in Kenya was conducted between 1984 and 1985. Two genera, Anopheles and Culex were found indoors in large numbers. The major species were Anopheles gambiae s.l., Anopheles pharoensis, and Culex quinquefasciatus, comprising 66 % and 21 % of the total catch, respectively. The large numbers of mosquitoes found resting indoors showed seasonal population fluctuations. The seasonal population increases observed were due to the availability of larval breeding conditions over a long period of time and to man-made environmental changes. These changes included irrigation canals and rice paddies. The irrigation canals and rice paddies were flooded from August till December, thus linking the flooding effects of the two rainy seasons. This enabled mosquitoes to breed continuously for up to 9 months per year.

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