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Decline and fall of the salmon fisheries in the Netherlands: is restocking the Rhine a reality?
de Groot, S.J. (1992). Decline and fall of the salmon fisheries in the Netherlands: is restocking the Rhine a reality? Aquacult. Fish. Manage. 23: 213-224
In: Aquaculture and Fisheries Management. Blackwell: Oxford. ISSN 0266-996X, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Anthropogenic factors; Depleted stocks; Fish culture; Fisheries; Fishery management; Migratory species; Pollution effects; Salmon fisheries; Weirs; Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]; ANE, North Sea [Marine Regions]; Europe, Rhine R. [Marine Regions]; Marine; Brackish water; Fresh water

Author  Top 
  • de Groot, S.J.

Abstract
    The Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, was once a major fishing industry along the River Rhine. This paper discusses the Dutch and German salmon catches over the years 1863-1950. Factors such as the increased use of locks and weirs along the Rhine, coupled with growth in pollution, led to a rapid decline in numbers. By 1933, the salmon fishing industry in the Netherlands had virtually ceased to exist. Of particular importance in the context of the Rhine are: the closure of two of the major migration routes to the sea (Haringvliet and Zuiderzee); morphological changes in the river; chemical and thermal pollution; the loss of accessible spawning and nursery areas of the required quality; the disappearance of salmon from other rivers that flow into the North Sea such as the Rivers Elbe, Weser and Ems. If salmon were only reintroduced into the Rhine, a certain proportion would probably stray and infiltrate these other rivers.

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