IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Basal and active metabolic rates of deep sea animals in relation to pressure and food ration
George, R.Y. (1985). Basal and active metabolic rates of deep sea animals in relation to pressure and food ration, in: Gibbs, P.E. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 19th European Marine Biology Symposium, Plymouth, Devon, UK, 16-21 September 1984. pp. 173-182
In: Gibbs, P.E. (Ed.) (1985). Proceedings of the 19th European Marine Biology Symposium, Plymouth, Devon, UK, 16-21 September 1984. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge. ISBN 0-521-30294-3. 541 pp., more

Available in  Author 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [16839]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • George, R.Y.

Abstract
    The respiratory and excretory rates in relation to resting and feeding activities of three different deep-sea species retrieved from the Blake Plateau and the continental slope environment (800-1200m depth) off the coast of North Carolina have been investigated. These upper abyssal species are the anomuran crab Parapagurus pilosimanus, the barnacle Arcoscalpellum puertoricanum and the coral Thecopsammia socialis. After rapid decompression from habitat depths, 12 individuals of each species were maintained alive at 6°C for several months at 1 atm. The basal and active metabolic rates were monitored at 1 atm and at habitat presure of 80 and 200 atm in a chamber with a transfer pump that enables exchange of water at regular time intervals without any loss of pressure. The cost of feeding activity is much greater than the cost of staying alive with oxygen consumption rates ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 ul/g/h and ammonia output of 1.50 to 7.42 ug/g/h. Pressure exerts significant influence on the NH3 excretory rate that is considerably lower at the habitat pressure of 80 and 200 atm. Moreover, duration of feeding activity is apparently abbreviated during the pressure acclimation period and this pattern of activity suggests pressure-induced energy conservative mechanisms that reduce metabolic cost. The data also suggest that respiration and NH3 excretion rates show significant reduction under starvation and under conditions of food rationing.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author