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Possible energy sources for chemoautotrophic prokaryotes symbiotic with invertebrates from a Norwegian fjord
Dando, P.R.; Southward, A.J.; Southward, E.C.; Barrett, R.L. (1986). Possible energy sources for chemoautotrophic prokaryotes symbiotic with invertebrates from a Norwegian fjord, in: Muus, K. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 20th European Marine Biology Symposium: Nutrient Cycling. Processes in Marine Sediments, Hirtshals, Denmark, 9-13 September 1985. Ophelia: International Journal of Marine Biology, 26: pp. 135-150
In: Muus, K. (Ed.) (1986). Proceedings of the 20th European Marine Biology Symposium: Nutrient Cycling. Processes in Marine Sediments, Hirtshals, Denmark, 9-13 September 1985. Ophelia: International Journal of Marine Biology, 26. Ophelia Publications: Helsingør. ISBN 87-981066-4-3. 477 pp., more
In: Ophelia: International Journal of Marine Biology. Ophelia Publications: Helsingør. ISSN 0078-5326, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [16882]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Dando, P.R., more
  • Southward, A.J., more
  • Southward, E.C.
  • Barrett, R.L.

Abstract
    In Ypsesund, a marine inlet near Bergen, Norway, the sediment at 33 m contains several invertebrate species that obtain most of their nourishment from endosymbiotic chemoautotrophic prokaryotes. The pogonophore Siboglinum fiordicum and the bivalve Lucinoma borealis penetrate 25 cm into the sediment, while the bivalves Myrtea spinifera and Thyasira flexuosa live in the top 8 cm. Concentrations of amino acids and possible energy sources for chemoautotrophy (hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, formate, ammonia, nitrite and sulphides) were measured at 5 cm intervals in the 0-70 cm layer of sediment. Within the 0-25 cm layer only ammonia and acid-labile sulphide were found in appreciable concentrations. The concentrations of methane, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and nitrite appear to be too low to provide an adequate energy input for the symbiotic bacteria. Extracts of prokaryote-containing tissues from the invertebrates show activity of enzymes concerned in the oxidation of sulphur. It is probable that reduced sulphur compounds are the energy source for the endosymbionts in these animals. The ways in which particulate sulphur species could be exploited are examined. S. fiordicum was found to contain 2.5 mM β-aminoglutaric acid. This compound might be involved in the transfer of fixed carbon from prokaryote to host.

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