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Diversity in intertidal communities with special reference to the Corallina officinalis community
Crisp, D.J.; Mwaiseje, B. (1989). Diversity in intertidal communities with special reference to the Corallina officinalis community, in: Ros, J.D. (Ed.) Topics in Marine Biology: Proceedings of the 22nd European Marine Biology Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, August 1987. Scientia Marina (Barcelona), 53(2-3): pp. 365-372
In: Ros, J.D. (Ed.) (1989). Topics in Marine Biology: Proceedings of the 22nd European Marine Biology Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, August 1987. Scientia Marina (Barcelona), 53(2-3). Instituto de Ciencias del Mar: Barcelona. 145-754 pp., more
In: Scientia Marina (Barcelona). Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. Institut de Ciènces del Mar: Barcelona. ISSN 0214-8358, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [16936]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Crisp, D.J.
  • Mwaiseje, B.

Abstract
    Species richness is distinguished from the evenness of apportionment of individuals among species. Confusing these concepts in "diversity indices" is condemned. Diversity should be related to specified taxa and habitats. Two kinds of biological diversity are distinguished -gradient diversity and mosaic diversity. Of various proposed causes of high diversity, niche creation through physical and biological heterogeneity is emphasised. It is shown that when there is a mutualistic relationship between species higher species richness can be achieved without loss of stability. Examples of such high diversity ecosystems include the phytal community of temperate tidepool algae. Observations on the phytal community associated with Corallina officinalis indicate that increasing the abundance of a dominant epiphytic serpulid, Spirorbis corallinae, correlates with higher numbers and greater species richness of the phytal. It is thought that the increase in the numbers and variety of spaces and surfaces created by settling spirorbids is the feature that offers more niches to the associated fauna.

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