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Archaeology meets marine ecology: The antiquity of maritime cultures and human impacts on marine fisheries and ecosystems
Erlandson, J.M.; Rick, T.C. (2010). Archaeology meets marine ecology: The antiquity of maritime cultures and human impacts on marine fisheries and ecosystems. Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. 2 2: 231-251
In: Carlson, C.A.; Giovannoni, S.J. (Ed.) (2010). Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. 2. Annual Review of Marine Science, 2. Annual Reviews: Palo Alto. ISBN 978-0-8243-4502-0. 493 pp., more
In: Annual Review of Marine Science. Annual Reviews: Palo Alto. ISSN 1941-1405, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Erlandson, J.M.
  • Rick, T.C.

Abstract
    Interdisciplinary study of coastal archaeological sites provides a wealth of information on the ecology and evolution of ancient marine animal populations, the structure of past marine ecosystems, and the history of human impacts on coastal fisheries. In this paper, we review recent methodological developments in the archaeology and historical ecology of coastal regions around the world. Using two case studies, we examine (a) a deep history of anthropogenic effects on the marine ecosystems of California's Channel Islands through the past 12,000 years and (b) geographic variation in the effects of human fishing on Pacific Island peoples who spread through Oceania during the late Holocene. These case studies—the first focused on hunter-gatherers, the second on maritime horticulturalists—provide evidence for shifting baselines and timelines, documenting a much deeper anthropogenic influence on many coastal ecosystems and fisheries than considered by most ecologists, conservation biologists, and fisheries managers.

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