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GIS-based environmental analysis, remote sensing, and niche modeling of seaweed communities
Pauly, K.; De Clerck, O. (2010). GIS-based environmental analysis, remote sensing, and niche modeling of seaweed communities, in: Israel, A. et al. (Ed.) Seaweeds and their role in globally changing environments. Cellular Origin, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology, 15: pp. 95-114. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-90-481-8569-6_6
In: Israel, A. et al. (Ed.) (2010). Seaweeds and their role in globally changing environments. Cellular Origin, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology, 15. Springer: Dordrecht. ISBN 978-90-481-8568-9. xxvii, 480 pp., more
In: Cellular Origin, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology. Springer: Dordrecht; Boston; London. ISSN 1871-661X, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 214452 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Aquatic communities; GIS; Remote sensing; Seaweeds; Marine

Authors  Top 

Abstract
    In the face of global change, spatially explicit studies or meta-analyses of published species data are much needed to understand the impact of the changing environment on living organisms, for instance by modeling and mapping species distributional shifts. A Nature Editorial (2008) recently discussed the need for spatially explicit biological data, stating that the absence or inaccuracy of geographical coordinates associated to every single sample prohibits, or at least jeopardizes, such studies in any research field. In this chapter, we show how geographic techniques such as remote sensing and applications based on geographic information systems (GIS) are the key to document changes in marine benthic macroalgal communities. Our aim is to introduce the evolution and basic principles of GIS and remote sensing to the phycological community and demonstrate their application in studies of marine macroalgae. Next, we review current geographical methods and techniques showing specific advantages and difficulties in spatial seaweed analyses. We conclude by demonstrating a remarkable lack of spatial data in seaweed studies to date and hence suggesting research priorities and new applications to gain more insight in global change-related seaweed issues.

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