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Growth and feed utilization of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata, L.) fed to satiation and restrictively at increasing dietary energy levels
Bonaldo, A.; Isani, G.; Fontanillas, R.; Parma, L.; Grilli, E.; Gatta, P.P. (2010). Growth and feed utilization of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata, L.) fed to satiation and restrictively at increasing dietary energy levels. Aquacult. Int. 18(5): 909-919. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10499-009-9312-0
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Sparus aurata Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Bonaldo, A.
  • Isani, G.
  • Fontanillas, R.
  • Parma, L.
  • Grilli, E.
  • Gatta, P.P.

Abstract
    Three isoproteic (47% protein) diets were formulated to contain graded levels of crude fat (diet D16:16%, diet D24: 24% and diet D32: 32%). Each diet was fed to satiation in three and to 80% satiation in two replicate groups of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), having an initial body weight of 72–74 g. The trial lasted 81 days. Groups fed to satiation showed higher final body weight (FBW; 238.8–252.3 g vs. 218.0–229.3 g) and daily growth index (DGI; 2.49–2.65%/day vs. 2.27–2.34%/day) than those fed to 80% satiation. Feed intake was significantly different both for feeding level and for diet composition. Fish fed to satiation had higher feed conversion rate (FCR) compared to the 80% satiation groups (1.33–1.44 vs. 1.13–1.17; P ≤ 0.001). Within satiation groups, FCR was significantly lower in fish fed D16 compared to fish fed D32 (1.33 vs. 1.44, P ≤ 0.05), whereas no statistical differences were found within the 80% satiation groups. The increase in dietary lipid level did not improve growth performance, feed efficiency and protein utilization but decreased gross lipid efficiency. Conversely, a reduction in ration from satiation to 80% satiation decreased DGI, thus improving FCR. Feed costs were influenced by dietary energy level and feeding ratio, the lowest energy diet at 80% satiation being the most profitable combination among the variables.

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