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Some clinical, microbiological and molecular characteristics of Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from various naturally infected fishes
El-Barbary, M.I. (2010). Some clinical, microbiological and molecular characteristics of Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from various naturally infected fishes. Aquacult. Int. 18(5): 943-954. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10499-009-9315-x
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Antibiotics; Diseases; Fish; Histopathology; Liver; Marine; Brackish water; Fresh water

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  • El-Barbary, M.I.

Abstract
    Heat-stable cytotonic enterotoxin gene (Ast) was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of twenty isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from various naturally infected fishes collected from both fresh and brackish water. These fishes were Nile tilapia and meagre, mullet and sea bream, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility, pathogenic characteristics of these isolates and histopathological alterations of liver from experimentally infected tilapia fish with A. hydrophila which contained Ast gene were investigated. PCR technique for the detection of Ast as specific gene for A. hydrophila genomes showed that 90% of tested A. hydrophila (18/20) contained Ast gene, which is specific for A. hydrophila (SSU).The in vitro susceptibility of 18 strains of A. hydrophila (SSU) to 9 antibiotics was evaluated. Oxytetracycline only was an effective antibiotic for all tested isolates. On contrast, all these isolates were resistant to amoxicillin, ampicillin and penicillin. Pathogenicity assay in this study proved that 33.3% of the tested A. hydrophila (6/18) were pathogenic for tilapia in vitro with various levels of virulence where 2/6 were classified as strongly virulent according to the severity of mortality rate. Microscopically, A. hydrophila toxins apparently cause irreparable systemic damage to liver which leads to death.

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