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Carbonate mounds and slope failures in the Porcupine Basin: a development model involving fluid venting
Henriet, J. P.; De Mol, B.; Vanneste, M.; Huvenne, V.; Van Rooij, D.; The Porcupine-Belgica '97, '98 and '99 Shipboard Parties (2001). Carbonate mounds and slope failures in the Porcupine Basin: a development model involving fluid venting, in: Shannon, P.M. et al. (Ed.) The petroleum exploration of Ireland's offshore basins. Geological Society Special Publication, 188: pp. 375-383
In: Shannon, P.M. et al. (Ed.) (2001). The petroleum exploration of Ireland's offshore basins. Geological Society Special Publication, 188. The Geological Society: London. ISBN 1-86239-087-8. 384 pp., more
In: Hartley, A.J. et al. (Ed.) Geological Society Special Publication. Geological Society of London: Oxford; London; Edinburgh; Boston, Mass.; Carlton, Vic.. ISSN 0305-8719, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 214886 [ OMA ]

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Huvenne, V., more
  • Van Rooij, D., more
  • The Porcupine-Belgica '97, '98 and '99 Shipboard Parties

Abstract
    High-resolution reflection seismic investigations carried out in the Porcupine Basin, SW of Ireland, have shed light on the presence of several provinces of giant carbonate mounds. An intriguing setting is found on the northern slope of the basin. A cluster of surface mounds appears to be flanked by a large upslope, crescent-shaped province of buried mounds. Below the transitional zone, large imbricated slide scars suggest repeated failures. The buried mounds rise from an undisturbed basal horizon and seem to represent a single event, confined in time and space. Both high-resolution and industrial seismic data reveal a close vertical match of the mound cluster with a lower, buried sea-bed failure, where hydrate build-up may have played a role. The latter association may not be entirely fortuitous. It is suggested that gas venting may have triggered the formation of the mound clusters, and that the underlying sea-bed failure forms a previous but different expression of gas venting, on a common, episodic fluid migration pathway but under strongly contrasting bottom water temperature conditions.

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