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Start-up, catch-up, keep-up, give-up stages in deep-water coral banks
De Mol, B.; Van Rensbergen, P.; Henriet, J.-P. (2004). Start-up, catch-up, keep-up, give-up stages in deep-water coral banks, in: 32nd International Geological Congress, Florence, Italy, August 20-28, 2004. Abstract Volume. pp. 1478 (Abstract 336-10)
In: (2004). 32nd International Geological Congress, Florence, Italy, August 20-28, 2004. Abstract Volume. IGC: Florence. 2 vols pp., more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 215026 [ OMA ]
Document types: Conference paper; Summary

Keyword
    Marine
Author keywords
    coral bank deep-water coral coral bank development palaeo proxies

Authors  Top 
  • De Mol, B., more
  • Van Rensbergen, P., more
  • Henriet, J.-P., more

Abstract
    Evolutionary phases of deep water coral banks have been recognised by mapping the spatial distribution and the morphology of coral banks in three deep-water coral provinces in the Porcupine Seabight. In analogy with stages of tropical reefs references to the sealevel response, start-up, catch-up, keep-up and give-up can be distinguished in coldwater reefs. In case of deep water coral banks the critical factor in the development is the local current regime, controlling the sedimentation and the food supply. The start-up phase in the basin took place after a Late Pliocene erosional period, characterised by widespread coral patches. Once sedimentation starts the coral banks accrete in a vertical direction by active baffling and extension of the biological cap (Keep-up). During the Catch-up phase, the framework will progressively be clogged with sediment and the accommodation space is limited by clastic sediment supply. nevertheless the coral bank development occurs in pace with the clastic sedimentation. When sediment supply exceeds the growth capacity of the coral bank, the surface with living coral reduces and the coral bank gets buried and draped by sediment (Give-up). These development phases indicate climate changes reflecting in the change of watermasses and the oceanographic regime. As such, deep-water coral banks can act as deep water paleaoclimate proxies in analogy to their tropical counterparts.

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