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Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of oxytetracycline in vannamei shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) and the effect of processing on the residues in muscle and shell
Uno, K.; Chaweepack, T.; Ruangpan, L. (2010). Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of oxytetracycline in vannamei shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) and the effect of processing on the residues in muscle and shell. Aquacult. Int. 18(6): 1003-1015. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10499-009-9318-7
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Bioavailability; Pharmacokinetics; Processing; Penaeus vannamei Boone, 1931 [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Uno, K.
  • Chaweepack, T.
  • Ruangpan, L.

Abstract
    The present study examined the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of oxytetracycline (OTC) in vannamei shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) after intra-sinus (10 mg/kg) and oral (10 and 50 mg/kg) administration and also investigated the net changes of OTC residues in the shrimp after the thermal, acid and alkaline processing methods. The hemolymph concentrations of OTC after intra-sinus dosing were best described by a two-compartment open model. The oral bioavailability was found to be 48.2 and 43.6% at doses of 10 and 50 mg OTC/kg, respectively. The peak hemolymph concentrations after 10 and 50 mg OTC/kg doses were 3.37 and 17.4 μg/ml; the times to peak hemolymph concentrations were 7 and 10 h. The elimination half-lives were found to be 15.0 and 11.5 h for the low and high dose, respectively. The residual OTC was rapidly eliminated from muscle with the elimination half-life value of 19.4 and 15.4 h, respectively, for the groups treated with doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. The residual OTC levels in the muscle fell below the MRL (0.2 μg/g) at 72 and 96-h post-dosing at dose levels of 10 or 50 mg/kg, respectively. Residual OTC levels in muscle and shell were approximately 20–50% lower in the thermal treatment such as boiling, baking and frying. By the acid treatment, OTC residues were reduced to >80%, while those were reduced to around 30% by alkaline treatment.

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