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Effect of dietary protein reduction with synthetic amino acids supplementation on growth performance, digestibility, and body composition of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei
Huai, M.-Y.; Liu, Y.-J.; Tian, L.-X.; Deng, S.-X; Xu, A.-L.; Gao, W.; Yang, H.-J. (2010). Effect of dietary protein reduction with synthetic amino acids supplementation on growth performance, digestibility, and body composition of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Aquacult. Int. 18(3): 255-269. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10499-009-9241-y
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Amino acids; Fish meal; Proteins; Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Huai, M.-Y.
  • Liu, Y.-J.
  • Tian, L.-X.
  • Deng, S.-X
  • Xu, A.-L.
  • Gao, W.
  • Yang, H.-J.

Abstract
    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of lowering crude protein level and fish-meal inclusion rate by using commercially available synthetic amino acid supplements in practical diets on the growth performance of Litopenaeus vannamei. In experiment 1, three diets were formulated to assess whether 50% of fish meal could be replaced by soybean meal with synthetic amino acid supplementation. Diet 1 was formulated as the normal control with 20% fish meal and 36% crude protein; diet 2 was the negative control with 34% crude protein and half of the fish meal was replaced with soybean meal; and diet 3 was similar to diet 2 but was supplemented with amino acids to ensure the level of lysine, methionine plus cystine, and threonine similar to that in the diet 1. After a 70-day feeding trial, weight gain and specific growth rate of shrimps fed diet 2 were significantly lower than those fed diet 3, and numerically lower than those fed diet 1. Feed intake of shrimps fed diet 3 was significantly higher than those fed diets 1 and 2. There were no significant differences in feed conversion ratio among shrimps fed different diets. In experiment 2, four diets were prepared with diet 1 as the normal control with 41.26% crude protein, diets 2–4 were formulated to contain 39.81, 38.40, and 35.52% of crude protein with synthetic amino acids were added to simulate the amino acid levels of the diet 1. After a 70-day feeding trial, it was found that reducing dietary crude protein from 41.26 to 35.52% did not affect weight gain or feed conversion ratio. The survival of crude protein 35.52% treatment was significantly lower than other treatments. No difference was observed in body protein, lipid composition, and apparent digestibility coefficient among dietary treatments. Results of this study suggested that dietary crude protein could be reduced from 41.26 to 35.52% in the diets of L. vannamei as long as synthetic amino acids were supplemented.

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