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Building sustainable high seas fisheries through certification processes: issues and perspectives = Assurer la durabilité des pêcheries de haute mer à travers des processus de certification: enjeux et perspectives
Rayfuse, R. (2009). Building sustainable high seas fisheries through certification processes: issues and perspectives = Assurer la durabilité des pêcheries de haute mer à travers des processus de certification: enjeux et perspectives, in: Rochette, J. (Ed.) (2009). Towards a New Governance of High Seas Biodiversity: International scientific seminar organized by the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI), March, 20-21, 2008, Principality of Monaco. Océanis (Paris), 35(1-2): pp. 93-108
In: Rochette, J. (Ed.) (2009). Towards a New Governance of High Seas Biodiversity: International scientific seminar organized by the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI), March, 20-21, 2008, Principality of Monaco. Océanis (Paris), 35(1-2). Institut Océanographique: Paris. ISBN 978-2-903581-56-5. 292 pp., more
In: Océanis (Paris). Institut Océanographique: Paris. ISSN 0182-0745, more
Peer reviewed article

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Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

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  • Rayfuse, R.

Abstract
    Certification processes are part of the broader category of trade related measures which are increasingly seen as effective tools in the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. The purpose of these measures is to create negative incentives to deter non-compliance with measures adopted by regional fisheries management organisations and arrangements by removing the profitability of non-compliant behaviour, to create positive incentives to comply by removing competitive advantages arising from non-compliance, and to provide information on the amount of fish in trade and which countries are involved to enable more effective management and enforcement decisions to be taken. Certification processes can be broadly defined as relating either to certification of catch by regional fisheries management organisations and arrangements through catch or trade documentation schemes, or as involving "eco-labelling" of products to indicate whether they have been harvested from sustainably managed fisheries. Experience in the fisheries sector of both types of certification process is limited to date and concerns have been raised as to their consistency with international trade law and as to their overall efficacy. This paper reviews the existing practice in relation to certification processes, identifying the challenges and promise held by each. Particular attention is paid to an examination of "eco-labelling" and third party certification processes and the possibilities for increased efficacy of certification processes through combining catch and trade documentation processes with other independent third party certification processes.

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