IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Phylogenetic relationships and remarkable radiation in Parartemia (Crustacea: Anostraca), the endemic brine shrimp of Australia: evidence from mitochondrial DNA sequences
Remigio, E.A.; Hebert, P.D.N.; Savage, A. (2001). Phylogenetic relationships and remarkable radiation in Parartemia (Crustacea: Anostraca), the endemic brine shrimp of Australia: evidence from mitochondrial DNA sequences. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 74(1): 59-71
In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. Academic Press: London; New York. ISSN 0024-4066, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Halophiles; Model; Rates; Rates; Rates; Substitution; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Remigio, E.A.
  • Hebert, P.D.N.
  • Savage, A.

Abstract
    The Australian continent is notable for the faunal radiations which have occurred in its saline inland waters. The endemic brine shrimp genus Parartemia inhabits many of these habitats. The complex pattern of morphological variation in parartemiids has impeded the establishment of a sound scheme of species relationships. The present study provides an explicit hypothesis of relationships for the genus based on nucleotide sequence data from a segment of mitochondrial DNA coding for the large subunit rRNA gene. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the eight known species are genetically distinct, and revealed the existence of at least two new species. The molecular data support certain morphology-based relationships among species, but are inconsistent with other hypotheses. There is evidence that most members of the genus arose in a short interval, followed by remarkable genetic divergence. Comparisons of levels of mt DNA sequence divergence between lineages from saline inland waters and freshwaters using representative crustacean groups from Australia that included parartemiids indicated profound differences in rates of evolution, with halophiles exhibiting greater rates of change than their counterparts from freshwaters.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors