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Mycoses in red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) caused by two deuteromycete fungi (Penicillium corylophilum and Cladosporium sphaerospermum)
Blaylock, R.B.; Overstreet, R.M.; Klich, M.A. (2001). Mycoses in red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) caused by two deuteromycete fungi (Penicillium corylophilum and Cladosporium sphaerospermum), in: Porter, J.W. (Ed.) (2001). The ecology and ethiology of newly emerging marine diseases. Developments in Hydrobiology, 159: pp. 221-228. dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1013124214166
In: Porter, J.W. (Ed.) (2001). The ecology and ethiology of newly emerging marine diseases. Reprinted from Hydrobiologia 460 (2001). Developments in Hydrobiology, 159. Kluwer Academic Publishers: Dordrecht. ISBN 1-4020-0240-8. xvi, 228 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: Den Haag. ISSN 0167-8418, more

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Keywords
    Aquaculture; Histopathology; Kidneys; Mycoses; Swim bladder; Lutjanus campechanus (Poey, 1860) [WoRMS]; Marine

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  • Blaylock, R.B.
  • Overstreet, R.M.
  • Klich, M.A.

Abstract
    We report two species of deuteromycete fungi (Penicillium corylophilum and Cladosporium sphaerospermum) concurrently infecting the swim bladder and posterior kidney and causing erratic behavior in two specimens of wild-caught, tank-held red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus). Lesions produced by both species infiltrated the immediately surrounding tissue and produced severe pathological changes; however, the infection apparently was not systemic. Only P. corylophilum grew in the initial culture from the swim bladder and only C. sphaerospermum grew in the initial culture from the kidney. Infection may have occurred upon penetration of a syringe to deflate the swim bladder. There was no horizontal transmission to 13 other specimens of red snapper held in the same tank. This suggests that these fungi are not primary pathogens. Injection of each species into various sites in the Gulf killifish, Fundulus grandis, failed to produce infections within 1 month, suggesting differences in susceptibility among species.

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