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Genetic variation of hatchery and wild stocks of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata martensii (Dunker, 1872), assessed by mitochondrial DNA analysis
Gwak, W.S.; Nakayama, K. (2011). Genetic variation of hatchery and wild stocks of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata martensii (Dunker, 1872), assessed by mitochondrial DNA analysis. Aquacult. Int. 19(3): 585-591
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    DNA; Genetic diversity; Mitochondria; Pearl oysters; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Gwak, W.S.
  • Nakayama, K.

Abstract
    In order to provide baseline information for the genetic resources, genetic variation in wild and cultured Pinctada fucata martensii from southern Korea and Japan was studied using nucleotide sequence analysis of 379 base pairs (bp) in the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI). The study included three hatchery stocks from Korea (Tongyeong) and Japan (Mie and Tsushima) and one wild stock from Korea (Geoje). A total of 3 haplotypes were identified in hatchery stocks of 78 individuals, of which 63 individuals shared 1 haplotype. Overall, nucleotide diversity (π) was low, ranging from 0.000 to 0.002, and haplotype diversity (h) ranged from 0.000 to 0.541. Considerably low haplotype and nucleotide diversities in hatchery stock indicated that low effective population size and consecutive selective breeding of P. fucata martensii could be responsible for the reduction in genetic variation. The wild stock exhibited low haplotype diversity (0.507 ± 0.039) with two shared haplotypes. The results of the present study with first record of wild pearl oyster in Korea support the possibility that the transplanted pearl oyster for overwintering experiments could have survived in winter. In order to enhance and/or maintain genetic diversity in the hatchery stock, further research should be directed toward genetic monitoring and evaluation of the hatchery and wild pearl oysters.

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