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Northern range expansion and coastal occurrences of the New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in the northeast Pacific
Davidson, T.M.; Brenneis, V.E.F.; de Rivera, C.; Draheim, R.; Gillespie, G.E. (2008). Northern range expansion and coastal occurrences of the New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) in the northeast Pacific. Aquat. Invasions 3(3): 349-353
In: Aquatic Invasions. Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre (REABIC): Helsinki. ISSN 1798-6540, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Brackish water; Gastropoda [WoRMS]; Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) [WoRMS]; Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) [WoRMS]; INE, Canada, British Columbia, Alberni Channel [Marine Regions]; INE, Canada, British Columbia, Vancouver I. [Marine Regions]; Brackish water
Author keywords
    brackish gastropods; British Columbia; New Zealand mud snail; Port Alberni; Potamopyrgus antipodarum; range expansion; Vancouver Island

Authors  Top 
  • Davidson, T.M.
  • Brenneis, V.E.F.
  • de Rivera, C.
  • Draheim, R.
  • Gillespie, G.E.

Abstract
    The New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) is a common invasive species in fresh and brackish water ecosystems in Europe, Australia, Japan, and North America. In some invaded habitats, P. antipodarum can reach high densities (over 500,000 snails m-2) and dominate the biomass of the benthos, leading to detrimental impacts to native biota and changes in ecosystem dynamics. We report the previously unpublished occurrence of P. antipodarum in thirteen fresh and brackish water systems adjacent to the Pacific coast of North America including a new northern range for P. antipodarum: Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (49.2479º, -124.8395º). We hypothesize the snail was spread from the Columbia River Estuary to Port Alberni via recreational watercraft or infected fishing equipment. Its discovery in Port Alberni reveals the potential for other aquatic nuisance species in the lower Columbia River to spread to British Columbia. Resource managers on the Pacific coast should remain vigilant and educate the public to prevent the further spread of the P. antipodarum as well as other aquatic invaders.

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