Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

In:

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Stepwise temperature regulation and its effect on growth, feeding and muscle growth patterns of juvenile Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.)
Larsen, S.V.; Imsland, A.K.; Lohne, P.; Pittman, K.; Foss, A. (2011). Stepwise temperature regulation and its effect on growth, feeding and muscle growth patterns of juvenile Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.). Aquacult. Int. 19(5): 825-837
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Feeding; Growth rate; Temperature; Hippoglossus hippoglossus (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Larsen, S.V.
  • Imsland, A.K.
  • Lohne, P.
  • Pittman, K., editor
  • Foss, A.

Abstract
    To investigate the possible direct effect of a stepwise reduction in temperature with increasing size on growth, feeding parameters and muscle growth patterns of juvenile Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.), 804 juvenile halibut (mean initial weight individuals: 14.2 g ± 0.2 SEM) were reared at constant 9, 12 and 15°C or shifted (T-step, i.e. 15–12°C after 36 days) for 99 days. Despite indications of lower optimal temperature for growth with increasing size, equal end weights were obtained between the constant 12°C, constant 15°C and T-step groups. Best overall growth was observed for the group kept at constant 12°C. The limited effect of the T-step group may relate to the size at movement (too big), the temperatures investigated (close to optimum) and the time and size interval investigated (too narrow). Differences in growth were reflected more by alterations in feed intake (C T and F%) than by differences in feed conversion efficiencies (FCE). Differences were found with respect to the density of muscle cells, whereas no differences were found between the average muscle cell diameters. The mean diameter of muscle cells tended to increase only slightly with increasing fish weight, while the mean density of muscle cells tended to decrease. Using an optimum temperature of 12°C, an indication of a possible increased rate of hyperplasia in relation to higher growth was seen.

 Top | Authors