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Growth, survival, and fatty acid composition of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus (Milne Edwards) fed diets containing different levels of vitamin E and lipid
Ouraji, H.; Kenari, A.M.A.; Shabanpour, B.; Shabani, A.; Sodagar, M.; Jafarpour, S.A.; Ebrahimi, G.H. (2011). Growth, survival, and fatty acid composition of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus (Milne Edwards) fed diets containing different levels of vitamin E and lipid. Aquacult. Int. 19(5): 903-916
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more

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Keywords
    Fatty acids; Growth rate; Lipids; Stability; Vitamin E; Fenneropenaeus indicus (H. Milne Edwards, 1837 [in Milne Edwards, 1834-1840]) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Ouraji, H.
  • Kenari, A.M.A.
  • Shabanpour, B.
  • Shabani, A.
  • Sodagar, M.
  • Jafarpour, S.A.
  • Ebrahimi, G.H.

Abstract
    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of two levels of vitamin E (100 and 300 mg/kg diet) along with two levels of lipid (9 and 14%) and their interaction on growth performance of Indian white shrimp and consequently to evaluate the fatty acid composition and lipid stability of its muscle tissue during frozen storage. Growth of juvenile Indian white shrimp was not significantly affected by dietary vitamin E and lipid levels. Muscle lipid content of shrimp fed diets with 14% lipid was significantly higher than that of with 9% lipid. Obvious effects of the increase in dietary lipid level on muscle fatty acid composition were significant decrease in proportion of 16:0 and increase in proportion of 20:5n-3. The content of vitamin E concentration in shrimp muscle reflected dietary vitamin E concentration and ranged from 6.68 to 14.8 mg/kg muscle corresponding to two (100 and 300 mg/kg) levels of vitamin E in fish diet, respectively. Subsequently, results showed that by increasing the concentration of vitamin E from 100 to 300 mg/kg in diet, the rate of lipid oxidation in the muscle tissue during frozen storage was reduced and, as a result, caused higher HUFA retention in muscle of shrimp fed diet with high lipid level.

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