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Interspecific hybridization in oysters: Restriction enzyme digestion chromosome banding confirms Crassostrea angulata x Crassostrea gigas F1 hybrids
Leitão, A.; Chaves, R.; Santos, S.; Guedes-Pinto, H.; Boudry, P. (2007). Interspecific hybridization in oysters: Restriction enzyme digestion chromosome banding confirms Crassostrea angulata x Crassostrea gigas F1 hybrids. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol. 343: 253-260
In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. Elsevier: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; Lausanne; Shannon; Amsterdam. ISSN 0022-0981, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Banding; Chromosomes; Enzyme activity; Hybridization; Identification; Interspecific relationships; Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck, 1819) [WoRMS]; Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Leitão, A.
  • Chaves, R.
  • Santos, S.
  • Guedes-Pinto, H.
  • Boudry, P.

Abstract
    The taxonomic status of the two commercially important cupped oysters, Crassostrea angulata, the Portuguese oyster (Lamarck, 1819) and Crassostrea gigas, the Japanese oyster (Thunberg, 1793) has long been in question. The recent observation of the hybridization between C. gigas and C. angulata and the production of fertile F1s led us to search for cytogenetic evidence of both parental genomes in the interspecific hybrids. The cytogenetic characterization of the hybrids was performed by the use of restriction endonuclease treatments. This technique has recently shown the potential for individual chromosome identification by banding in oysters. Chromosomes of C. gigas, C. angulata and their hybrids were treated with two different restriction enzymes (ApaI and HaeIII), stained with Giemsa, and examined for banding patterns. These chromosome markers allowed the parental haploid sets to be identified in the hybrids. The analysis of the banded karyotypes of the interspecific hybrids showed that for each chromosome pair, one of the homologues presented a banding pattern consistent with that of C. gigas and the other homologue presented a banding pattern consistent with that of C. angulata. These cytogenetic results substantiate the reported interspecific hybridization between C. gigas and C. angulata. In view of these results and taking into account the present expansion of C. gigas aquaculture in southern Europe, the question of the need for preservation of pure C. angulata stocks should be raised as only a few populations remain in the south of Spain and Portugal. Recently, changes in the genetic composition of populations in southern Portugal have indeed been observed, showing that human activities have created contact zones between the two taxa while no natural sympatric zones exist in Europe.

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