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Morphology and environment of cold-water coral carbonate mounds on the NW European margin
Wheeler, A.J.; Beyer, A.; Freiwald, A.; de Haas, H.; Huvenne, V.A.I.; Kozachenko, M.; Olu-Le Roy, K.; Opderbecke, J. (2007). Morphology and environment of cold-water coral carbonate mounds on the NW European margin. Int. J. Earth Sci. 96(1): 37-56. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00531-006-0130-6
In: International Journal of Earth Sciences. Springer: Berlin; Heidelberg. ISSN 1437-3254, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 227842 [ OMA ]

Keyword
    Marine
Author keywords
    Carbonate mound; Cold-water coral; Morphology; Environmental setting; Seabed mapping

Authors  Top 
  • Wheeler, A.J., more
  • Beyer, A.
  • Freiwald, A., more
  • de Haas, H., more
  • Huvenne, V.A.I., more
  • Kozachenko, M.
  • Olu-Le Roy, K.
  • Opderbecke, J.

Abstract
    Cold-water coral carbonate mounds, owing their presence mainly to the framework building coral Lophelia pertusa and the activity of associated organisms, are common along the European margin with their spatial distribution allowing them to be divided into a number of mound provinces. Variation in mound attributes are explored via a series of case studies on mound provinces that have been the most intensely investigated: Belgica, Hovland, Pelagia, Logachev and Norwegian Mounds. Morphological variation between mound provinces is discussed under the premise that mound morphology is an expression of the environmental conditions under which mounds are initiated and grow. Cold-water coral carbonate mounds can be divided into those exhibiting “inherited” morphologies (where mound morphology reflects the morphology of the colonised features) and “developed” morphology (where the mounds assume their own gross morphology mainly reflecting dominant hydrodynamic controls). Finer-scale, surface morphological features mainly reflecting biological growth forms are also discussed.

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