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Short term development of intracontinental rifts, with reference to the late Quaternary of the Rukwa Rift (East African Rift System)
Kjennerud, T.; Lippard, S.J.; Vanhauwaert, P. (2001). Short term development of intracontinental rifts, with reference to the late Quaternary of the Rukwa Rift (East African Rift System). Mar. Pet. Geol. 18(3): 307-317. dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0264-8172(01)00007-1
In: Marine and Petroleum Geology. Elsevier: Guildford. ISSN 0264-8172, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 280232 [ OMA ]

Author keywords
    Normal faulting; Rukwa Rift; Late Quaternary

Authors  Top 
  • Kjennerud, T.
  • Lippard, S.J.
  • Vanhauwaert, P.

Abstract
    Relatively low-resolution seismic data and high contemporaneous rift topography normally limit quantitative analysis of normal faults in rifts. The availability of a recently collected high-resolution reflection seismic survey in the SE part of the presently active Rukwa Rift (East African Rift System) coupled with high sedimentation rates in the submerged part of the rift makes detailed quantitative analysis possible. High-resolution (down to about 1 m) seismic data penetrate ca. 300 m (representing about 150,000 years) of the uppermost sediments and show fine details of normal faulting and related structures. Displacements on the faults, which occur in the hanging wall of the major rift boundary fault, range from a few metres up to 100 m. They show increasing displacements with depth and characteristic rollover folding of the hanging walls. Fault propagation occurred upwards through the rapidly accumulating lake sediments and was preceded by flexuring and folding of the sediments. The geometry of the seismic sequences with alternating wedge-shaped and tabular units reflects pulsed activity on the faults. Fault displacement rates of up to 1.6 mm yr-1 have been estimated. Each extensional pulse has a duration of 1000s to 10,000s of years. The quiescent stages have a similar duration. Up to 2.5% extension has occurred during the recent evolution.

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