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Mesoscale and microscale spatial variability of bacteria and viruses during a Phaeocystis globosa bloom in the Eastern English Channel
Seymour, J.R.; Seuront, L.; Doubell, M.J.; Mitchell, J.G. (2008). Mesoscale and microscale spatial variability of bacteria and viruses during a Phaeocystis globosa bloom in the Eastern English Channel. Est., Coast. and Shelf Sci. 80(4): 589-597. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2008.09.011
In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. Academic Press: London; New York. ISSN 0272-7714, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 280086 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Bacteria [WoRMS]; Phaeocystis Lagerheim, 1893 [WoRMS]; Viruses [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    microscale; bacteria; virus; Phaeocystis; patchiness

Authors  Top 
  • Seymour, J.R.
  • Seuront, L.
  • Doubell, M.J.
  • Mitchell, J.G.

Abstract
    Sampling was conducted within inshore and offshore sites, characterized by highly dissimilar hydrodynamic and hydrobiological conditions, in the Eastern English Channel. The eutrophic inshore site was dominated by the influence of a dense bloom of the Prymnesiophyceae phytoplankton species Phaeocystis globosa, while the offshore site was characterized by more oceanic conditions. Within each site the microscale distributions of chlorophyll a and several flow cytometrically-defined subpopulations of heterotrophic bacteria and viruses were measured at a spatial resolution of 5 cm. The inshore site was characterized by comparatively high levels of microscale spatial variability, with concentrations of chlorophyll a, heterotrophic bacteria, and viruses varying by 8, 11 and 3.5-fold respectively across distances of several centimeters. Within the offshore site, microscale distributions of chlorophyll a and bacteria were markedly less variable than within the inshore site, although viruses exhibited slightly higher levels of heterogeneity. Significant mesoscale variability was also observed when mean microbial parameters were compared between the inshore and offshore sites. However, when the extent of change (max/min and coefficient of variation) was compared between meso- and microscales, the variability observed at the microscale, particularly in the inshore site, was substantially greater. This pattern suggests that microscale processes associated with Phaeocystis globosa bloom dynamics can generate heterogeneity amongst microbial communities to a greater degree than large scale oceanographic discontinuities.

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