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Sibling cannibalism in dorada under experimental conditions. I. Ontogeny, dynamics, bioenergetics of cannibalism and prey size selectivity
Baras, E.; Ndao, M.; Maxi, M.Y.J.; Jeandrain, D.; Thomé, J.-P.; Vandewalle, P.; Mélard, C. (2000). Sibling cannibalism in dorada under experimental conditions. I. Ontogeny, dynamics, bioenergetics of cannibalism and prey size selectivity. J. Fish Biol. 57(4): 1001-1020. dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2000.tb02207.x
In: Journal of Fish Biology. Fisheries Society of the British Isles: London,New York,. ISSN 0022-1112, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 280062 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Characidae Latreille, 1825 [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    cannibalism; predation; evolution; adaptation; behaviour; Characidae

Authors  Top 
  • Baras, E.
  • Ndao, M.
  • Maxi, M.Y.J.
  • Jeandrain, D.
  • Thomé, J.-P., more
  • Vandewalle, P., more
  • Mélard, C.

Abstract
    Cannibalism among embryos and larvae of Brycon moorei (Characidae) occurs during daytime and night-time, and persists under permanent darkness. Embryos and larvae of dorada provisioned with formulated feed over the first week of exogenous feeding did not survive, except for those exerting cannibalism. When oered alternative fish prey [embryos of Prochilodus magdalenae (0·5–0·8 mg) and Oreochromis niloticus (9·10 mg)], 1-day-old embryos of dorada preferred preying on these, thereby reducing early cannibalism. However, this promoted depensatory growth and more intense cannibalism later in the larval stage. Dorada provisioned with Artemia nauplii in excess showed more homogeneous growth and higher survival, most cannibalistic acts being restricted to the first 24 h of exogenous feeding, just after oral teeth were fully developed (21 h after hatching). Provisioning dorada with Artemia nauplii a few hours before their oral teeth were fully developed reduced early cannibalism from 41 to 15%. High proportions of deformed fish caused higher mortality, both directly and indirectly, as they promoted early cannibalism, depensatory growth and more intense cannibalism among larvae. The initial sorting of embryos, based on their occupation of the water column improved survival significantly during the first week of exogenous feeding, up to 52% in progenies containing <10% of deformed fish. Size-grading of larvae and young juveniles over the next 2 weeks reduced cannibalism to 2·6 and 1·9% day-1, in the first and second weeks, respectively. These results indicate that cannibalism in dorada can be mitigated eciently through appropriate rearing procedures, and open promising perspectives for the intensive culture of this fast-growing tropical species.

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