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The biology of hydrothermal vent animals: physiology, biochemistry, and autotrophic symbioses
Childress, J.J.; Fisher, C.R. (1995). The biology of hydrothermal vent animals: physiology, biochemistry, and autotrophic symbioses. Oceanogr. Mar. Biol. Ann. Rev. 30: 337-441
In: Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review. Aberdeen University Press/Allen & Unwin: Aberdeen. ISSN 0078-3218, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Hydrothermal vents; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Childress, J.J.
  • Fisher, C.R.

Abstract
    The deep-sea hydrothermal vents are short-lived habitats dominated by temperatures much warmer than those of the surrounding deep-sea and characterised by a novel and highly toxic chemistry. Organisms have, however, adapted to these conditions and high densities of animals live surrounding the venting waters. This work endeavours to describe current knowledge concerning the physiology and biochemistry of hydrothermal vent animals in the context of what it can teach us about the deep-sea and marine symbioses in general. A major theme is the physiological and biochemical attributes of the vent chemoautotrophic symbioses, and the integration of these attributes in the functioning associations. First we consider the characteristics of the vent environment in the context of the dynamic nature of the water flows which support these habitats. Subsequent sections review the major areas where information concerning the physiology and biochemistry of vent animals is available. The concluding sections draw this information together to approach a better understanding of the functioning of the chemoautotrophic symbioses which dominate these habitats.

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