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Short term dynamics of planktonic foraminiferal sedimentation in the porcupine seabight
Harbers, A.; Schönfeld, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Pfannkuche, O. (2010). Short term dynamics of planktonic foraminiferal sedimentation in the porcupine seabight. Micropaleontology 56(3-4): 259-274
In: Micropaleontology. The Micropaleontology Project: New York,. ISSN 0026-2803, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 268997 [ OMA ]

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Harbers, A.
  • Schönfeld, J.
  • Rüggeberg, A., more
  • Pfannkuche, O.

Abstract
    Modern planktonic foraminifera collected with a sediment trap, and subfossil assemblages from surface sediments from the Galway, Mound in the Porcupine Seabight off southwestern Ireland, (northeastern Atlantic), were studied in order to investigate recent assemblage variations. The sediment trap operated from April to August 2004 with a sampling interval of eight days and covered the spring bloom and early summer. Ten different species were recorded Globorotalia hirsuta, Turborotalita quinqueloba and Globigerinita glutinata appeared predominately in spring. Neogloboquadrina incompta, Globigerina bulloides and Globorotalia inflate were abundant in spring and summer. Highest foraminiferal tests flux occurred in June. The faunal composition was similar to subfossil assemblages from surface sediments, but the species proportions were different. This contrast was mainly driven by the subtropical species G. hirsute which was frequent in 2004 but rare in surface sediment samples and in eat her plankton collections obtained from the southern Porcupine Seabight during the 1990s. The individual weight of deposited foraminifera is mainly influenced by the spring bloom, as indicated by sea-surface chlorophyll-a data. The top three-ranked species G. hirsata, N. incompta and G. bulloides contributed 87 % to the foraminiferal carbonate flux at Galway Mound.

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