Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

In:

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
report an error in this recordbasket (1): add | show Printer-friendly version

one publication added to basket [213602]
Habitat trade-offs in the summer and winter performance of the planthopper Prokelisia marginata introduced against the intertidal grass Spartina alterniflora in Willapa Bay, Washington
Grevstad, F.S.; Switzer, R.W.; Wecker, M.S. (2004). Habitat trade-offs in the summer and winter performance of the planthopper Prokelisia marginata introduced against the intertidal grass Spartina alterniflora in Willapa Bay, Washington, in: Cullen, J.M. et al. (Ed.) (2004). Proceedings of the XI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds Canberra, Australia, 27 April-2 May 2003. pp. 523-528
In: Cullen, J.M. et al. (Ed.) (2004). Proceedings of the XI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds Canberra, Australia, 27 April-2 May 2003. CSIRO Entomology: Canberra. ISBN 0-643-06948-8. 648 pp., more

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Abundance; Biological control; Growth rate; Survival; Winter; Prokelisia marginata (Van Duzee, 1897) [WoRMS]; Spartina alterniflora [WoRMS]; INE, USA, Washington, Willapa Bay [gazetteer]; Brackish water

Authors  Top 
  • Grevstad, F.S.
  • Switzer, R.W.
  • Wecker, M.S.

Abstract
    Spartina alterniflora is invasive in estuaries of the Pacific coast of North America, as well as in Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. Willapa Bay, located along the southern coast of Washington state, has the largest infestation of invasive S. alterniflora and is the site of the first biocontrol program against this grass. The recently introduced biocontrol agent, Prokelisia marginata (Delphacidae), has exhibited explosive growth during the summer months, followed by severe declines over the winter. Correlations of quantifiable site characteristics with the growth and decline of 12 released populations reveal the habitat favouring P. marginata. Factors favouring population growth during the summer include high host leaf nitrogen and low spider abundance. Winter survival was greatly improved by the presence of intact dead S. alterniflora culms throughout the winter. Interestingly, sites favouring P. marginata population growth in the summer had the lowest survival over the winter. These correlations
    and trade-offs suggest possible future strategies for enhancing biocontrol through habitat manipulation.

 Top | Authors