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Response of technical-biological bank protection to ship-generated wave actions – first results
De Roo, S.; Troch, P. (2010). Response of technical-biological bank protection to ship-generated wave actions – first results, in: Dittrich, A. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Fluvial Hydraulics, Braunschweig, Germany, September 08-10, 2010: River flow 2010 [CD-ROM]. pp. 1339-1345
In: Dittrich, A. et al. (Ed.) (2010). Proceedings of the International Conference on Fluvial Hydraulics, Braunschweig, Germany, September 08-10, 2010: River flow 2010 [CD-ROM]. Bundesanstalt für Wasserbau: [s.l.]. ISBN 978-3-939230-00-7. 1 CD-ROM pp., more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 233294 [ OMA ]
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine
Author keywords
    ship waves; bank protection; energy dissipation; prototype monitoring

Authors  Top 

Abstract
    Growing awareness of the environmental aspects related to the transitional zone between land and water directs research into more ecologically sound, ‘soft’ engineering bank protections too. Considering this new set of boundary conditions, off-bank timber piling in combination with reed vegetation has been installed along the river Lys (Zulte, Belgium), a non-tidal, restricted waterway subject to heavy shipping traffic, in an attempt to reconcile both the technical and environmental requirements of a revetment. Since ship-induced water movements form the core threat to bank and vegetation stability, a subtle compromise between load and protection needs to be found.To determine and evaluate the ship-induced forcing, we designed an on-site prototype monitoring system to continuously acquire data of the impact of the ship wave climate on the bank protection. The first results indicate that the wave attack of the predominant primary ship wave system on the river bank is not sufficiently reduced by a single row of off-bank piling, in contrast with a 20% reduction of the secondary wave heights. Hence, questions arise whether this type of bank protection is a valuable alternative on these waterways. Ongoing research therefore addresses the twofold load reduction of this technicalbiological bank protection, including the wave attenuation through a reed vegetation belt.

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