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Pre-whaling genetic diversity and population ecology in Eastern Pacific gray whales: insights from ancient DNA and stable isotopes
Alter, S.E.; Newsome, S.D.; Palumbi, S.R. (2012). Pre-whaling genetic diversity and population ecology in Eastern Pacific gray whales: insights from ancient DNA and stable isotopes. PLoS One 7(5): 12 pp. dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0035039
In: PLoS One. Public Library of Science: San Francisco. ISSN 1932-6203, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Alter, S.E.
  • Newsome, S.D.
  • Palumbi, S.R.

Abstract
    Commercial whaling decimated many whale populations, including the eastern Pacific gray whale, but little is known about how population dynamics or ecology differed prior to these removals. Of particular interest is the possibility of a large population decline prior to whaling, as such a decline could explain the ,5-fold difference between genetic estimates of prior abundance and estimates based on historical records. We analyzed genetic (mitochondrial control region) and isotopic information from modern and prehistoric gray whales using serial coalescent simulations and Bayesian skyline analyses to test for a pre-whaling decline and to examine prehistoric genetic diversity, population dynamics and ecology. Simulations demonstrate that significant genetic differences observed between ancient and modern samples could be caused by a large, recent population bottleneck, roughly concurrent with commercial whaling. Stable isotopes show minimal differences between modern and ancient gray whale foraging ecology. Using rejection-based Approximate Bayesian Computation, we estimate the size of the population bottleneck at its minimum abundance and the pre-bottleneck abundance. Our results agree with previous genetic studies suggesting the historical size of the eastern gray whale population was roughly three to five times its current size.

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