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Wastewater as a source of nitrifying bacteria in river systems: the case of the River Seine downstream from ParisPeer reviewed article
Brion, N.; Billen, G. (2000). Wastewater as a source of nitrifying bacteria in river systems: the case of the River Seine downstream from Paris. Wat. Res. 34(12): 3213-3221
In: Water Research: Oxford. ISSN 0043-1354, more

Also published as
  • Brion, N.; Billen, G. (2000). Wastewater as a source of nitrifying bacteria in river systems: the case of the River Seine downstream from Paris, in: (2001). VLIZ Coll. Rep. 31(2001). VLIZ Collected Reprints: Marine and Coastal Research in Flanders, 31: pp. chapter 7 [Subsequent publication], more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 98771 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Marine; Brackish water; Fresh water

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Abstract
    The River Seine downstream from Paris receives large amounts of ammonium (about 200 µmol/l) from treated and untreated wastewater effluents. In such large river systems, due to the slow growth of nitrifying bacteria, the small size of the nitrifying population present in the water column often represents the limiting factor for nitrification of the contaminating ammonium. In this work we demonstrate that discharge of urban effluents can represent an important seeding of nitrifying bacteria, influencing the dynamics of nitrification in the river downstream. A nitrifying bacteria biomass in wastewater was deduced from H14CO3- potential nitrifying activity measurements. these were found to be higher in untreated wastewater (1-200 µgC/l) and in treated effluents (0.8-30 µgC/l) than in the receiving river water (0.5-5 µgC/l). a retrospective analysis of the nitrification process in the River Seine downstream from Paris suggests that the overall ammonium oxidation rate has been continuously reduced over the past 20 years (from 1.5 to 1.0 µmol/l/h), as a result of the improvement of the treatment of Paris wastewater and the reduction of the discharge of untreated wastewater (from 14% to 0.2% of the total wastewater discharge).

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