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Overlap in distribution and diets of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), Norwegian spring-spawning herring (Clupea harengus) and blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) in the Norwegian Sea during late summer
Langøy, H.; Nøttestad, L.; Skaret, G.; Broms, C.; Fernö, A. (2012). Overlap in distribution and diets of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), Norwegian spring-spawning herring (Clupea harengus) and blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) in the Norwegian Sea during late summer. Mar. Biol. Res. Spec. Issue 8(5-6): 442-460. dx.doi.org/10.1080/17451000.2011.642803
In: Marine Biology Research. Taylor & Francis: Oslo. ISSN 1745-1000, more
Peer reviewed article

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Keywords
    Diets; Fish; Planktivores; ANE, Norwegian Sea [gazetteer]; Marine
Author keywords
    Planktivorous fish; Spatial overlap; Interspecific competition

Authors  Top 
  • Langøy, H.
  • Nøttestad, L.
  • Skaret, G.
  • Broms, C.
  • Fernö, A.

Abstract
    Based on two large-scale surveys in the Norwegian Sea in July 2004 and 2006 we investigated the potential overlap in distribution and diets and association with environmental variables for mackerel, herring and blue whiting. Mackerel and blue whiting had low overlap in both distribution and diets, and were associated with warm Atlantic and cold prey-rich Arctic waters, respectively. Also, herring and mackerel were negatively correlated, associated with different environmental variables and even had low diet overlap in Atlantic water where the highest overlap in distribution was observed, but these trends were much clearer in 2006 than in 2004. Prey was patchily distributed and data from single stations indicated that feeding was opportunistic, in particular for mackerel. However, mackerel diet width and feeding incidence were similar between the years, whereas herring was more selective in 2004, probably reaching the end of the feeding season. A delayed peak in Calanus availability was indicated in 2006 and may have prolonged the feeding season, partly explain the difference between the years. Our data did not indicate a prey shift due to encounters between mackerel and herring. Concentrated efforts in limited areas are needed to further elucidate this aspect of interaction.

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