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Rediscovery of Cereopsis studeri Koch, 1891, a forgotten Mediterranean soft coral species, and its inclusion in the genus Nidalia Gray, 1835 (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nidaliidae)
López-Gonzáles, P.J.; Grinyó, J.; Gili, J.-M. (2012). Rediscovery of Cereopsis studeri Koch, 1891, a forgotten Mediterranean soft coral species, and its inclusion in the genus Nidalia Gray, 1835 (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nidaliidae). Mar. Biol. Res. 8(7): 594-604. dx.doi.org/10.1080/17451000.2011.650178
In: Marine Biology Research. Taylor & Francis: Oslo; Basingstoke. ISSN 1745-1000, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Manned submersibles; Alcyonacea [WoRMS]; Cereopsis studeri Koch, 1891 [WoRMS]; Nidalia Gray, 1834 [WoRMS]; MED, Mediterranean [Marine Regions]; Marine
Author keywords
    Soft coral

Authors  Top 
  • López-Gonzáles, P.J.
  • Grinyó, J.
  • Gili, J.-M.

Abstract
    Cereopsis studeri was described by G. von Koch in 1891 with material from Naples. However, it was subsequently synonymized, erroneously identified, and overlooked in subsequent soft coral literature of the twentieth century. After the original description, this species was not recorded or correctly described for 120 years. The study of newly collected material from the North Western Mediterranean permits the re-description of this forgotten species and its assignation to the genus Nidalia in the family Nidaliidae. The main features of Nidalia studeri com. nov. are: colony torch-like, a capitulum light orange in colour, not laterally flattened, dome-shaped and not distinctly projecting beyond the stalk, introvert with sclerites transversally placed in two longitudinal rows per interseptal space, anthocodial crown with 28–38 sclerite rows, points separated from polyps distally, formed by 6–9 pairs of sclerites, and the presence of intermediate points (secondary points) between principal (interseptal) ones. Nidalia studeri is here compared with its closest congeners, especially with the Indonesian species N. simpsoni, species from the West Indian Region N. dissidens, N.occidentalis, N. deichmannae, and the recently described Nidalia aurantia from the Mid-Atlantic Ocean. This is the first time that the genus Nidalia and the family Nidaliidae have been reported with certainty for the Mediterranean Sea.

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