Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

In:

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (1): add | show Printer-friendly version

one publication added to basket [216510]
Seafloor deformation and forecasts of the April 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount
Chadwick Jr., W.W.; Nooner, S.L.; Butterfield, D.A.; Lilley, M.D. (2012). Seafloor deformation and forecasts of the April 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount. Nature Geoscience 5: 474-477. dx.doi.org/10.1038/ngeo1464
In: Nature Geoscience. Nature Publishing Group: London. ISSN 1752-0894, more
Peer reviewed article

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Chadwick Jr., W.W.
  • Nooner, S.L.
  • Butterfield, D.A.
  • Lilley, M.D.

Abstract
    Axial Seamount is an active submarine volcano located at the intersection between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca spreading centre in the northeast Pacific Ocean1, 2. The volcano has been closely monitored since it erupted in 1998 (refs 3, 4). Since then, Axial Seamount seemed to exhibit a similar inflation–deflation cycle to basaltic volcanoes on land and, on that basis, was expected to erupt again sometime before 2014 or 2020 (refs 5, 6). In April 2011 Axial Seamount erupted. Here we report continuous measurements of ocean bottom pressure that document the deflation–inflation cycle of Axial Seamount between 1998 and 2011. We find that the volcano inflation rate, caused by the intrusion of magma, gradually increased in the months leading up to the 2011 eruption. Sudden uplift occurred 40–55?min before the eruption onset, which we interpret as a precursor event. Based on our measurements of ground deformation through the entire eruption cycle at Axial Seamount, we suggest that another eruption could occur as early as 2018. We propose that the long-term eruptive cycle of Axial Seamount could be more predictable compared with its subaerial counterparts because the volcano receives a relatively steady supply of magma through the Cobb hotspot and because it is located on thin oceanic crust at a spreading plate boundary.

 Top | Authors