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Ethanobotany of Xylocarpus rumphii, an endangered tree species in Sri Lanka
Kumara, M.P.; Jayatissa, L.P.; Hettiarachi, P.L.; Wickramasinghe, W.A.A.D.L.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F. (2009). Ethanobotany of Xylocarpus rumphii, an endangered tree species in Sri Lanka, in: Dahdouh-Guebas, F. et al. Proceedings of the Symposium African Botany in Brussels. pp. 91
In: Dahdouh-Guebas, F. et al. (2009). Proceedings of the Symposium African Botany in Brussels. Université libre de Bruxelles - ULB / Vrije Universiteit Brussel - VUB: Belgium. 120 + 10 annex. pp., more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 236968 [ OMA ]
Document types: Conference paper; Summary

Authors  Top 
  • Kumara, M.P.
  • Jayatissa, L.P.
  • Hettiarachi, P.L.
  • Wickramasinghe, W.A.A.D.L., more
  • Dahdouh-Guebas, F., more

Abstract
    Xylocarpus is a small genus of the mahogany family (Meliaceae), comprising three mangrove species i.e.. X. granatum, X. moluccensis, and X. mekongensis and one species that normally inhabits sandy and rocky sea-shores in the tropics i.e. X. rumphii. Out of these four species, X. rumphii appears to be less common in distribution, abundance, as well as in research carried out on it. As an example, about 70 chemical constituents have been isolated from the first two species, but such records on X. rumphii are scanty.In Sri Lanka, only two species of Xylocarpus, i.e. X. granatum and X. moluccencis were reported originally, but in low abundances. As previously reported X. rumphii was restricted to few individuals at only one location in the country. A recent exploration, however, encountered the same species in more places, however again in very low abundances. As its distribution is restricted to the sea-shore and the coastal belt of the country is under high anthropogenic pressure, X. rumphii becomes an endangered species in Sri Lanka.In contrast, it is reported that the ethnobotanical use of X. rumphii in Sri Lanka is outstanding. A survey carried out on ethnobotanical uses of the species revealed that, parts of this plant have been used as a major constituent in preparations of various ayurvedic drugs. Since centuries, those preparations have been used to treat at least 12 ailments in humans. It is also reported that this plant is used in traditional medicine to treat fish poisoning as well as alcohol poisoning. These uses are still in practice, but now under threat due to the scarcity of the species.In contrast to the use of X. granatum as a medicinal plant in many other countries, it is not used as such in Sri Lanka, even though its higher abundance as compared to that of X. rumphii. This might imply a higher potential for bioactive compounds to be found in X. rumphii. All these reports emphasize the urgent need for the conservation of this species

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