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Monitoring structural mangrove forests over time (2001-2010)
Cunha-Lignon, M.; Menghini, R.P.; de Almeida, R.; Coelho, C.Jr.; Schaeffer-Novelli, Y.; Cintrón, G.; Mampel, M.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F. (2010). Monitoring structural mangrove forests over time (2001-2010), in: The 2010 International Meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation: Tropical biodiversity: surviving the food,energy and climate crisis - 19-23 July, Bali, Indonesia - Abstract book. pp. 255
In: (2010). The 2010 International Meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation: Tropical biodiversity: surviving the food,energy and climate crisis - 19-23 July, Bali, Indonesia - Abstract book. Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation: Bali. 357 pp., more

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Document types: Conference paper; Summary

Authors  Top 
  • Cunha-Lignon, M., more
  • Menghini, R.P.
  • de Almeida, R.
  • Coelho, C.Jr.
  • Schaeffer-Novelli, Y.
  • Cintrón, G.
  • Mampel, M.
  • Dahdouh-Guebas, F., more

Abstract
    Mangroves occupy geomorphologically active estuarine settings but many studies have focused on short-term. Static views fail to capture the wholeness of these systems and could lead to failed conservation policies or management guidelines. These wetlands are of critical interest to resource managers because of their productivity, economic, and ecological roles. This paper describes the structural, temporal dynamics of forests at the Cananéia-Iguape Coastal System, located along the south coast of São Paulo State (Brazil), between latitudes 24°40’S and 25°20’S where three mangrove species occur in within different depositional facies: Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae); Laguncularia racemosa (Combretaceae); Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae/Avicenniaceae). Monitoring was done in January/2001, November/2002, May/2003, November/2003, May/2004, November/2004, July/2008, January/2009, July/2009 and January/2010. In each of 15 plots in total, all plants were identified, and tree diameter and average height were recorded. Mean tree diameter, basal area dominance, and stem density were assessed. The forest’s succession revealed three distinct stages of development with increasing diameter and mean height: 1. colonization; 2. young; and 3. mature. Where tidal energy dominates, the initial and young stages were dominated by Laguncularia racemosa (96-100%) and mature stages by Avicennia schaueriana (75-92%). Where fluvial energy dominates, Rhizophora mangle dominated in all stages. Sedimentary and hydrological conditions are essential in defining which typical mangrove forest species will colonize accretion areas and how zonation and succession will be manifested. Monitoring structural characteristics over time helps to understand processes involved the differentiation of the landscape. The analysis of historical satellite images allows the assessment of processes at higher hierarchical levels and the relations between morphogenetic and ecological views.

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