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Phylogenetic analysis of the pearlfish tribe Carapini (Pisces: Carapidae)
Parmentier, E.; Castillo Cabello, G.; Chardon, M.; Vandewalle, P. (2000). Phylogenetic analysis of the pearlfish tribe Carapini (Pisces: Carapidae). Acta Zool. (Stockh.) 81(4): 293-306.
In: Acta Zoologica (Stockholm). Svenska Bokfoerlaget: Stockholm. ISSN 0001-7272, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Author keywords
    phylogeny; Carapidae; ecomorphology; skull; head muscle

Authors  Top 
  • Parmentier, E., more
  • Castillo Cabello, G., more
  • Chardon, M.
  • Vandewalle, P., more

    Fishes of the tribe Carapini (Encheliophis and Carapus) share a noteworthy peculiarity: they shelter in holothurian echinoderms or bivalve hosts. Some species are considered parasitic, others commensal. This study focuses on the phylogeny of the tribe, using two other Carapidae species as an outgroup (Snyderidia canina and Onuxodon fowleri). Insofar as possible, the selected anatomical and behavioural characters where chosen in an ecomorphological perspective, as features that could be responses to various lifestyle-related constraints. Our character selection also took into account the fact that some features are (presumably) linked. Such features were grouped together as a single trait to avoid their overvaluation.This methodology enabled commensals to be separated from parasites, the former belonging to Carapus and the latter to Encheliophis. Carapus species reflect in their morphology the constraints imposed by a diet of hard, mobile, elusive prey, showing predator-type features: a strong dentition, a wide mouth opening, a robust food intake apparatus. On the other hand, the endoparasitic Encheliophis species show a generally weaker buccal apparatus and narrow mouth opening, in relation to the different constraints of their lifestyle where the diet constraints are less pronounced: they eat body parts of their host. Changes in both generic diagnoses are proposed and three species are transferred from Encheliophis to Carapus.

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