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Microgeographic variation in allozyme frequencies in relation to the degree of exposure to wave action in the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus (L.) (Prosobranchia: Muricacea)
Day, A.J. (1990). Microgeographic variation in allozyme frequencies in relation to the degree of exposure to wave action in the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus (L.) (Prosobranchia: Muricacea). Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 40(3): 245-261. hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1095-8312.1990.tb00538.x
In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. Academic Press: London; New York. ISSN 0024-4066, more
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Keywords
    Allozymes; Wave action; Nucella lapillus (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; ANE, British Isles, England, Devon [Marine Regions]; Marine
Author keywords
    Microgeographic variation; Morphological variation

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  • Day, A.J.

Abstract
    Nucella lapillus from 15 sites 50 m to 21 km apart in S. Devon, S. W. England were analysed for allozyme variation at eight soluble enzyme loci. Sites were classified as either Exposed or Sheltered and a hierarchical analysis of allozyme variation carried out using Wright's Fixation Index, FST. Whelks from Sheltered sites segregated for alleles at the Est-3, Lap-2, Pep-2 and Mdh-1 loci which were virtually absent from exposed sites resulting in high FST values (0.289–0.506) when all samples were included. Consequently mean heterozygosity of the Sheltered samples was roughly twice that of the Exposed. Between Sheltered sites the frequencies of these ‘additional’ alleles varied substantially, even on a microgeographic scale and were found to be highly correlated with exposure. Within individuals the presence of the ‘sheltered’ alleles was correlated with the possession of the ‘sheltered’ shell shape as indicated by length divided by aperture height. This must necessarily be the case, however, if both are related independently to exposure. Although these correlations imply the action of selection there is evidence within the data for stochastic factors affecting the pattern observed. Complicating the picture further is the correspondence observed in the distribution of the ‘sheltered’ alleles with the known distribution of chromosomal translocations. Phenotypic associations within individuals also support the hypothesis that variation at the Est-3, Lap-2, Mdh-1 and Pet-2 loci is related to variation in chromosome number. However, the nature of the relations of karyotype and allozyme variation with shell shape and exposure remain speculative.

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