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Life history and population maintenance strategies of Calanoides carinatus (Copepoda: Calanoida) in the southern Benguela ecosystem
Verheye, H.M.; Hutchings, L.; Peterson, W.T. (1991). Life history and population maintenance strategies of Calanoides carinatus (Copepoda: Calanoida) in the southern Benguela ecosystem. S. Afr. J. Mar. Sci./S.-Afr. Tydskr. Seewet. 11(1): 179-191. hdl.handle.net/10.2989/025776191784287600
In: South African Journal of Marine Science = Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Seewetenskap. Marine & Coastal Management: Cape Town. ISSN 0257-7615, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 246668 [ OMA ]

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Verheye, H.M.
  • Hutchings, L.
  • Peterson, W.T.

Abstract
    Analysis of quarterly cross-shelf distribution patterns of juvenile and adult Calanoides carinatus off the Cape Columbine upwelling centre in the southern Benguela ecosystem shows that this copepod has behavioural adaptations which result in clear patterns of inshore-offshore zonation. The combination of differential diel vertical movements of the various stages, seasonal ontogenetic migration and the resultant differential exploitation of cross-shelf advective processes and longshore current regimes play an important role in the maintenance of populations within the coastal upwelling areas of the southern Benguela ecosystem. At lower latitudes, C. carinatus utilizes true diapause in its life-cycle strategy to bridge the 8–10 month period between upwelling seasons. In the Benguela, however, the presence of an inshore active and an offshore resting component enables local C. carinatus populations to maintain a perennial presence. Because of a protracted upwelling season and occasional upwelling in winter, seasonal fluctuations in the abundance of C. carinatus in the Benguela ecosystem, ranging from 4 700·m-2 in winter to 11 200·m-2 during peak upwelling, are not as striking as they are in tropical upwelling regions.

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