IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Vertical distribution and diel vertical migration of Calanoides carinatus (Krøyer, 1849) developmental stages in the southern Benguela upwelling region
Verheye, H.M.; Field, J.G. (1992). Vertical distribution and diel vertical migration of Calanoides carinatus (Krøyer, 1849) developmental stages in the southern Benguela upwelling region. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol. 158(1): 123-140. hdl.handle.net/10.1016/0022-0981(92)90312-X
In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. Elsevier: New York. ISSN 0022-0981, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 246676 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Calanoides carinatus (Krøyer, 1849) [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Calanoides carinatus; Diel vertical migration; Food availability; Female maturity; Ontogenetic; Sexual differentiation

Authors  Top 
  • Verheye, H.M.
  • Field, J.G.

Abstract
    Diel vertical distribution patterns of the copepodite and adult stages of Calanoides carinatus were analysed using a 10-day time series of observations under contrasting upwelling conditions at an Anchor Station in St Helena Bay, South Africa. The diel vertical migratory behaviour of C. carinatus is probably controlled by both exogenous and endogenous factors. Changes in the food assemblage associated with upwelling significantly modified the vertical distribution and migration of C. carinatus from nonmigratory behaviour under nonsatiating feeding conditions (microflagellates) to marked diel vertical migrations in an upwelling-induced, improved feeding environment (small diatoms). Intrinsic factors such as age, sex and state of ovary maturity also play an important role in the vertical habitat partitioning of C. carinatus in St Helena Bay. Such differential migratory strategies are believed to be adaptations for optimal food utilisation and population maintenance through age-specific depth partitioning. Other adaptive advantages are maximization of reproductive success by copulating at depth at night, and rapid egg development and maximal survival of the first-feeding nauplii by spawning near the surface.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors