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A first checklist of cetaceans of Ghana, Gulf of Guinea, and a shore-based survey of interactions with coastal fisheries. Scientific Committee document SC/51/SM35, International Whaling Commission, May 1999, Grenada
Van Waerebeek, K.; Ofori-Danson, P.K. (1999). A first checklist of cetaceans of Ghana, Gulf of Guinea, and a shore-based survey of interactions with coastal fisheries. Scientific Committee document SC/51/SM35, International Whaling Commission, May 1999, Grenada. International Whaling Commission: Grenada. 9 pp.

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Keywords
    Kogia sima (Owen, 1866) [WoRMS]; Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski, 1781) [WoRMS]; Stenella clymene (Gray, 1850) [WoRMS]; Steno bredanensis (G. Cuvier in Lesson, 1828) [WoRMS]; Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821) [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHIN; CLYMENE DOLPHIN; ROUGH-TOOTHED DOLPHIN; DWARF SPERM WHALE; SPERM WHALE; HUMPBACK WHALE; CONSERVATION; INCIDENTAL CATCHES; DIRECTED CATCHES; FISHERIES; GILLNETS

Authors  Top 
  • Van Waerebeek, K., more
  • Ofori-Danson, P.K.

Abstract
    To date, six cetacean species are confirmed to occur in coastal waters off Ghana: five odontocetes Stenella clymene, Steno bredanensis, Tursiops truncatus, Kogia simus, Physeter macrocephalus, and Megaptera novaeangliae. A stranded humpback whale calf raised questions about breeding stock. We found no evidence for the presence of the Atlantic hump-backed dolphin Sousa teuszii ; either it has become rare or it does not occur off Ghana. Unrestrained coastal development may pose a threat for nearshore species. Regular and year-round bycatches of small cetaceans are documented in artisanal gillnet fisheries from Apam, Jamestown (Accra), Kpone and Winneba. At Apam, drift gillnet fishermen intentionally capture dolphins with sharks and tuna. Annual takes at Apam and Jamestown probably count in the low hundreds, higher than at Kpone and Winneba. Bottlenose dolphins are also known to be taken in semi-industrial purse-seines (Jamestown). Carcasses are not filleted, but hacked into small portions including bone, and retailed locally for food. This explains why beach-combing around fishing villages did not yield any findings of skeletal parts. Field research and monitoring effort should continue.

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