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Seagrass-associated bryozoan communities from the Late Pliocene of the Island of Rhodes (Greece)
Moissette, P. (2013). Seagrass-associated bryozoan communities from the Late Pliocene of the Island of Rhodes (Greece), in: Ernst, A. et al. (Ed.) Bryozoan Studies 2010. Lecture Notes in Earth System Sciences, 143: pp. 187-201. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-3-642-16411-8_13
In: Ernst, A. et al. (Ed.) (2013). Bryozoan Studies 2010. Lecture Notes in Earth System Sciences, 143. Springer: Berlin. ISBN 978-3-642-16410-1. viii, 463 pp., more
In: Lecture Notes in Earth System Sciences. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 2193-8571, more

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Keywords
    Pliocene; Seagrass; Bryozoa [WoRMS]; Posidonia oceanica (Linnaeus) Delile, 1813 [WoRMS]; MED, Greece, Aegean I., Rhodes I. [Marine Regions]; Marine

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  • Moissette, P.

Abstract
    On the island of Rhodes (Greece) the late Pliocene shallow-water siliciclastic deposits of the Kritika Member (Rhodes Formation) contain well-preserved leaves and rhizomes of the Mediterranean endemic marine phanerogam Posidonia oceanica. The leaf moulds are found on the bedding planes of fine-grained sands, whereas the rhizomes are preserved in life position within coarse-grained sediments.

    The bryozoan community occurring either on the leaf moulds or as zoarial fragments in the sediment containing them consists of 25 species. Most of them belong to the membraniporiforms, while the cellariiforms are represented by numerous segments. Rare fragments of adeoniform and vinculariiform colonies also occur.

    The community of bryozoans associated with the rhizomes comprises 49 species. The most common fragments belong to an adeoniform species, whereas membraniporiforms and cellariiforms are only moderately abundant. The vinculariiforms and celleporiforms are relatively uncommon, whereas the catenicelliforms, lunulitiforms and reteporiforms are scarce.

    In the studied beds, bryozoans are the most diverse group of invertebrates and are represented by a total of 58 species, most of them extant. A comparison with present-day Posidonia oceanica meadows shows that many species are common to both seagrass communities. Three extant species are even obligative epiphytes of P. oceanica leaves. Several other species, although not associated exclusively with this marine phanerogam, generally thrive on its leaves and rhizomes.


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