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Phylogeography of the mud crab (Scylla serrate) in the Indo-West Pacific reappraised from mitochondrial molecular and oceanographic clues: transoceanic dispersal and coastal sequential colonization
Lijun, H.; Zhang, A.; Zhu, C.; Weese, D.; Qiao, Z. (2011). Phylogeography of the mud crab (Scylla serrate) in the Indo-West Pacific reappraised from mitochondrial molecular and oceanographic clues: transoceanic dispersal and coastal sequential colonization. Mar. Ecol. (Berl.) 32: 52-64
In: Marine Ecology (Berlin). Blackwell: Berlin. ISSN 0173-9565, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
Author keywords
    Coalescent simulation, colonization history, cytochrome oxidase I, Indo-West Pacific, paleo-oceanic circulations, Scylla serrate

Authors  Top 
  • Lijun, H.
  • Zhang, A.
  • Zhu, C.
  • Weese, D.
  • Qiao, Z.

Abstract
    The widespread mud crab, Scylla serrate, of the Indo-West Pacific is an excellent model species to demonstrate how the colonization history of a species can be influenced by complex oceanographic conditions. Through the combination of ecological data (fossil records and paleo-oceanographic conditions) and molecular data (coalescent simulations, network analysis, and nucleotide diversity tests), the phylogeographic history of S. serrate was re-analyzed. Based on the analysis of mtDNA cytochrome oxidase I sequences, two major clades were identified for S. serrate, including a widespread clade (Clade I) with three disjunct geographic clusters (IA, IB and IC) and an endemic Northwest Australian clade (Clade II). Moreover, a significant phylogeographic structure corresponding to four subpopulations was revealed: Northwest Australia, West Indian Ocean, Red Sea-South China Sea and West Pacific. A colonization history of a Northwest Australia origin for S. serrate followed by westward transmarine dispersal across the Indian Ocean for Clade I and sequential colonization from the West Indian Ocean to Red Sea-South China Sea and West Pacific was corroborated. The Pleistocene fluctuations of paleo-oceanographic conditions including surface circulations and physical topography in the Indo-West Pacific might be responsible for the wide distribution, colonization history and genetic divergence of this species.

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