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Amplified Sediment waves in the Irish Sea (AmSedIS)
Van Landeghem, K.; Besio, G.; Niemann, H.; Mellett, C.; Huws, D.; Steinle, L.; O'Reilly, S.; Croker, P.; Hodgson, D.; Williams, D. (2013). Amplified Sediment waves in the Irish Sea (AmSedIS), in: Van Lancker, V. et al. (Ed.) MARID 2013: Fourth International Conference on Marine and River Dune Dynamics. Bruges, Belgium, 15-17 April 2013. VLIZ Special Publication, 65: pp. 285-290
In: Van Lancker, V.; Garlan, T. (Ed.) (2013). MARID 2013: Fourth International Conference on Marine and River Dune Dynamics. Bruges, Belgium, 15-17 April 2013. VLIZ Special Publication, 65. Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences/SHOM/Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ): Oostende. ISBN 978-2-11-128352-7. 338 pp., more
In: VLIZ Special Publication. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende. ISSN 1377-0950, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Van Landeghem, K.
  • Besio, G.
  • Niemann, H.
  • Mellett, C.
  • Huws, D.
  • Steinle, L.
  • O'Reilly, S.
  • Croker, P.
  • Hodgson, D.
  • Williams, D.

Abstract
    Exceptionally high, straight-crested and trochoidal sediment waves have recently been observed on shelf seas world-wide, and reach heights of up to 36 m in the Irish Sea. It is uncertain how the interplay between geological, biogeochemical and hydrodynamic processes influences the migration and extreme growth of these sediment waves. The AmSedIS project thus sets out to (1) investigate the role of sediment granulometry and sedimentavailability on both “extreme” and “normal” sediment wave development and (2) investigate the potential association of methane derived carbonate formation with extreme sediment wave growth. The preliminary findings are: (1) The crests of unusually high and trochoidal sediment waves still migrate over several meters per year and they consist of coarser, more poorly sorted sediments in comparison to the "normal" sediments waves; (2) Methane seepage is not considered a factor in extreme sediment wave development; (3) The excess of mobile sediment supply seems to allow for "extreme" sediment wave growth, and is linked to palaeo-tunnel valleys and the finer sediments that fill them or with converging sediment transport pathways; (4) The variation in sediment from sediment wave trough to crest to trough will form the basis for more advanced numerical modelling.

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