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Proceedings of the First International Workshop on the Management and Culture of Marine Species Used in Traditional Medicines: July 4-9, 1998, Cebu City, Philippines
Moreau, M.-A.; Hall, H.J.; Vincent, A. (Ed.) (2000). Proceedings of the First International Workshop on the Management and Culture of Marine Species Used in Traditional Medicines: July 4-9, 1998, Cebu City, Philippines. Project Seahorse: Montreal. ISBN 0-9686503-0-9. 240 pp.

Available in  Authors 
  • VLIZ: Archive A184 [248506]
  • VLIZ: Non-open access 248505
Document type: Conference

Keywords
    Mariculture; Marine organisms; Pharmacology; Therapeutics; Traditional medicine; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Moreau, M.-A., editor
  • Hall, H.J., editor
  • Vincent, A., editor

Abstract
    Hundreds of marine species are used in traditional medicines around the world. Perhaps eighty percent of the world's people depend at least partly on traditional medicine, according to the World Health Organisation. Demand is increasing as human populations grow and economic change enhances purchasing power for medicines. The United Nations Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) noted in 1997 that uncontrolled trade of wild animals and plants for traditional medicine could pose conservation worries. The main case study of marine species in trade, on seahorses, found that wild populations were indeed declining in the face of growing demand for medicinal use (and probably also because of habitat damage and bycatch). This fact was recognised by both producers and consumers, and led to concern for other marine medicinal species.This workshop arose directly from requests by a wide range of stakeholders associated with the trade in marine medicinals. Many fishers, traders, and traditional medicine practitioners had been asking for help to balance dwindling supplies with growing demand for marine species of medicinal value. Nearly all these producers and consumers suggested that aquaculture could help meet needs. The aquaculturists, meanwhile, were acutely conscious of the difficulties in culturing many marine species. They also wanted advice on which individuals and which species were most marketable. Fisheries managers and conservationists were becoming increasingly concerned about overconsumption of marine species for traditional medicine, and wary of aquaculture ventures that might do more environmental damage than good. It seemed time to talk, and find common ground for future initiatives in managing marine medicinal species.

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