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Morphological and molecular data confirm species assignment and dispersal of the genus Ligia (Crustacea: Isopoda: Ligiidae) along northeastern coastal China and East Asia
Yin, J.; Pan, D.; He, C.; Wang, A.; Yan, J.; Sun, H. (2013). Morphological and molecular data confirm species assignment and dispersal of the genus Ligia (Crustacea: Isopoda: Ligiidae) along northeastern coastal China and East Asia. Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 169(2): 362-376. hdl.handle.net/10.1111/zoj.12068
In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. Academic Press: London. ISSN 0024-4082, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Ligia; Morphology; Phylogeny; Taxonomy; Ligia cinerascens Budde-Lund, 1885 [WoRMS]; Ligia exotica Roux, 1828 [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Ligia cinerascens; Ligia exotica; Sympatric distribution

Authors  Top 
  • Yin, J.
  • Pan, D.
  • He, C.
  • Wang, A.
  • Yan, J.
  • Sun, H.

Abstract
    The morphological traits and mitochondrial genes of sympatric sea slaters from the genus Ligia were analysed from samples collected along northeastern coastal China and adjacent coastal East Asia to assign the species and to obtain interpretations of their distributions. Using 338 sequences and 199 diagnoses of 16S polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) from 331 specimens sampled from 26 localities, and homological sequences from counterparts from South Korea and the west coast of the USA, we assigned these taxa into two distinct species, Ligia exotica and Ligia cinerascens. Both species are recovered as two monophyletic clades in the robust phylogenetic hypothesis presented here. The northern boundaries of these species in China and the Korean peninsula are more southern than those of counterparts in Japan. Ligia exotica in northeastern coastal China is further split into two geographical subclades (B1 and B2), coexisting near 35°N. The distribution range of L. cinerascens covers the whole range of L. exotica subclade B1. Counterparts in Japan show a similar pattern. Oceanic rafting, shipping, damming and planting of seaweed are proposed as the media for the contemporary connectivity among populations of Ligia species inhabiting coastal China.

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