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An evaluation of the achievements of the First International Polar Year
Elzinga, A. (2010). An evaluation of the achievements of the First International Polar Year, in: Barr, S. et al. (Ed.) The history of the International Polar Years (IPYs). From Pole to Pole, : pp. 109-126. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-3-642-12402-0_4
In: Barr, S.; Lüdecke, C. (Ed.) (2010). The history of the International Polar Years (IPYs). From Pole to Pole. Springer: Berlin. ISBN 978-3-642-12402-0. xi, 319 pp.. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-3-642-12402-0, more
In: From Pole to Pole. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 2193-7338, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

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  • Elzinga, A.

Abstract
    First of all it should be noted that the first polar year did not start from scratch. During the 50 years prior to it a lot of polar expeditions with significant research components had already taken place. Differentiation in science together with societal needs of agriculture, commerce and navigation had contributed to the existence of meteorology and magnetic studies as important disciplines. Reporting and plotting weather observations had become systematised and benefited from the development of telegraph services. Systematic observation in the upper part of the northern hemisphere was however lacking, while at the same time it was intimated that weather events in that region might have a bearing on weather variability in Europe and North America. What was new and pioneering with the first international polar year was its dedication to obtaining the first series ever of coordinated synoptic observations at multiple locations in the Arctic. Moreover, it was the first international meteorological experiment in a defined region over a specific period of observation. In addition there were two regular stations set in the far south (see below), plus a meteorological station in Port Stanley,1 while 35 temperate and tropical observatories were also engaged. Magnetic observatories all over the world were involved.

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