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Volatile organic compounds in various marine organisms from the southern North Sea
Roose, P.; Brinkman, U.A.Th. (2000). Volatile organic compounds in various marine organisms from the southern North Sea. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 40(12): 1167-1177. dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0025-326X(00)00081-3
In: Marine Pollution Bulletin. Macmillan: London. ISSN 0025-326X, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Roose, P.; Brinkman, U.A.Th. (2005). Volatile organic compounds in various marine organisms from the southern North Sea, in: Roose, P. Volatile organic compounds and related microcontaminants in the Scheldt estuary and the southern North Sea: method development and monitoring. pp. 143-162, more

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Keywords
    Marine organisms; Volatile organic compounds; ANE, North Sea, Southern Bight [Marine Regions]; Marine
Author keywords
    VOCs; marine organisms; southern North Sea; hazard assessment; levels; partitioning; statistical analysis

Authors  Top 
  • Roose, P., more
  • Brinkman, U.A.Th., more

Abstract
    The concentration levels of 12 priority volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were determined in two species of vertebrates and four species of invertebrates from sampling stations in the Southern North Sea, using a modified Tekmar LSC 2000 purge and trap system coupled to GC-MS. In general, concentration levels of VOCs found in this study were of the same order of magnitude as those previously reported in the literature. The concentrations of the chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs), with the exception of chloroform, tended to be lower than those of the monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs). The experimental data were statistically evaluated using both cluster and principal component analysis (PCA). From the results of cluster analysis and PCA, no specific groups could be distinguished on the basis of geographical, temporal or biological parameters. However, based on the cluster analysis and the PCA, the VOCs could be divided into three groups, C2-substituted benzenes, CHCs and benzene plus toluene. This division could be related to different types of sources. Finally, it was shown that organisms can be used to monitor the presence of VOCs in the marine environment and the observed concentrations levels were compared with proposed safety levels.

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