IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

High-resolution X-ray computed tomography in geosciences: A review of the current technology and applications
Cnudde, V.; Boone, M.N. (2013). High-resolution X-ray computed tomography in geosciences: A review of the current technology and applications. Earth-Sci. Rev. 123: 1-17. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2013.04.003
In: Earth-Science Reviews. Elsevier: Amsterdam; Lausanne; London; New York; Oxford; Shannon. ISSN 0012-8252, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Methodology; Micropalaeontology
Author keywords
    High-resolution X-ray CT; Geosciences; 3D analysis

Authors  Top 
  • Cnudde, V., more
  • Boone, M.N.

Abstract
    High-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (HRXCT) or micro-CT (mu CT) is a frequently used non-destructive 3D imaging and analysis technique for the investigation of internal structures of a large variety of objects, including geomaterials. Although the possibilities of X-ray micro-CT are becoming better appreciated in earth science research, the demands on this technique are also approaching certain physical limitations. As such, there remains a lot of research to be done in order to solve all the technical problems that occur when higher demands are put on the technique. In this paper, a review of the principle, the advantages and limitations of X-ray CT itself are presented, together with an overview of some current applications of micro-CT in geosciences. One of the main advantages of this technique is the fact that it is a non-destructive characterization technique which allows 4D monitoring of internal structural changes at resolutions down to a few hundred nanometres. Limitations of this technique are the operator dependency for the 3D image analysis from the reconstructed data, the discretization effects and possible imaging artefacts. Driven by the technological and computational progress, the technique is continuously growing as an analysis tool in geosciences and is becoming one of the standard techniques, as is shown by the large and still increasing number of publications in this research area. It is foreseen that this number will continue to rise, and micro-CF will become an indispensable technique in the field of geosciences.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors